Feedback Here

fbook  tweeter  linkin  google
Global contents also translated in Chinese

Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Moscow showcases futuristic, trendy styles

"The October edition of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week kicked off with traditional finale of the Futurum Moscow providing a fresh start to the event. The show kick started with futuristic and retrofuturistic collection of young designer Sakina K that comprised quilted white overcoats with Japanese hirogana symbols, black balaclavas, Yakuza-like tattoos, see-through bags and long black belts. The program Vasilisa Vetrova created by the biggest social network in the country, VKontakte, in a partnership with Futurum Moscow presented a collection inspired by the French impressionism."

 

Mercedes Benz Fashion Week in Moscow showcases futuristic trendy styles 002The October edition of Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week kicked off with traditional finale of the Futurum Moscow providing a fresh start to the event. The show kick started with futuristic and retrofuturistic collection of young designer Sakina K that comprised quilted white overcoats with Japanese hirogana symbols, black balaclavas, Yakuza-like tattoos, see-through bags and long black belts. The program Vasilisa Vetrova created by the biggest social network in the country, VKontakte, in a partnership with Futurum Moscow presented a collection inspired by the French impressionism.

Streetwear in bright colors

The light and airy collection SETI combined blue, purple and teal abstract prints and opplique work inMercedes Benz Fashion Week in Moscow showcases futuristic trendy styles 001 intricately-constructed dresses and shirts tied with long belts. The Daria Lukash collection, on the other hand, refurbished old carpets and wool blankets into scarves, sweatshirts and even handbags. Daniil Kostyshin’s collection combined bright-orange elements with teal, orange and blue outerwear. Vassili Volchok displayed minimalist streetwear in a striking red and black color. The Hovanskie brothers combined classic streetwear tropes with beautiful, flowing semi-transparent dresses. Otocyon showed subdued tones of black white and red, used in jackets with tasteful silver accessories, long black dresses with bright white accents, flowing skirts with thin striping and pastel coats combined with elegant felt slippers.

Adding a military touch to these collections

While Alkhanashvili displayed militarism with a genderqueer side, Dinara Murasova collection added a definite Asiatic flare featuring female models dressed in traditionally male military coats of olive and black. Maria Iliynishna’s collection combined small grey jackets with metal slave collar rings.

The FactiveFace collection comprised silken free-flowing garments using clashing colors and Matisse and Chagall-inspired prints in bright yellow and blue to Jackson Pollock-like splatters of black on white. Be.Li.Ve, collection ethnic prints - ranging from Maori to Aztec to Slavic - played a central role.

Inspired by global warming and eco-energy

A fully recovered fabric collection inspired by global warming and eco recovery, kruzhok showcased gas masks and breathing tubes as accessories. Another collection of practical techwear - six one six - comprised belts and buckles, Japan-inspired jackets - mostly teal and black-and-white. The Not Today collection featured long hoodies and reversible overcoats with bright red print over a white background. A collection Svarka fully inspired by the 1980’s – comprised long Matrix-inspired coats, black, red and blue color combos, and cords coming out of sleeves and collars.

Odor, a new collection from designer Nikita Kalmykov, had an assortment of light, simple sleepwear for men with long sleeves lavish silks and lace. The collection Citizen_A featured models coming out with typical housewife tools - from washing up liquid to rubber gloves and sponges. The collection itself had a constructivist feel, with plastic overcoats using mostly primary colors and transparent plastic raincoats galore.

The evening closed with a showcase of latest collection by Jean Rudoff that displayed prints ranging from Gaspar Noe-inspired neon typefaces, to classic acid symbolism of the 1990’s, with models proudly handing out fake LSD stamps with the slogan “Acid Moscow” and a smiley face.

The title partner of the Fashion Week was Mercedes-Benz. The Russian partners for the event included Schaffhausen and glo as official partners, L’Oréal Professionnel as the official stylist, Mary Kay as the official make-up artist, Harmaan as the Official partner, DHL as the Official logistics partner and Metropol as the Official hotel.

 

 
LATEST TOP NEWS
 
 
MOST POPULAR NEWS